Abbotsford, British Columbia | Chilliwack, BC | Langley, BC

Cliff and Sherry Jury

We’re passionate about birds and nature. That’s why we opened a Wild Birds Unlimited Nature Shop in our community.

Abbotsford, British Columbia

#13-33324 South Fraser Way
Abbotsford, BC V2S 2B4

Phone: (604) 852-1960
Fax: -

Store Hours:
Mon - Sat: 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sun: Closed


Chilliwack, British Columbia

8810-C Young Road
Chilliwack, BC V2P 4P5

Phone: (604) 792-1239
Fax: -

Store Hours:
Mon - Sat: 10:00 am - 5:00 pm


Langley, British Columbia

Willowbrook Park Shopping Centre,
#2-6131 200th Street
Langley, BC V2Y 1A2

Phone: (604) 510-2035
Fax: -

Store Hours:
Mon - Fri: 10:00 am - 5:30 pm
Sat: 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sun: 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

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We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

Hummingbird

So Much to Know About Hummingbirds!

Spring is a much anticipated time for our smallest backyard-winged visitors. Hummingbirds may be the most anticipated bird to visit our yards. And why not? These littlest jewels of the backyard have some of the biggest personalities.

Hummingbirds are indeed small, weighing 1/10th of an ounce; about the weight of a penny. They also lay the world’s smallest bird egg; about the size of a blueberry.

For such a little bird, hummingbirds can be very feisty and aggressive when defending their territories; which includes nectar feeders. Multiple feeders, spread throughout your yard, will encourage more hummingbirds to visit and keep bullies at bay. The more feeders you offer and the more spread out they are, the more difficult it is for a protective hummingbird to defend all the feeders. Others, like females or even juveniles, will be able to eat more often, perhaps staying longer to feed or rest at feeders.

Speaking of feeders, these little birds have big appetites. Hummingbirds eat about every ten minutes and their diet is not made up entirely of nectar. They spend more than 25% of their time foraging for small spiders and insects to obtain essential amino acids and other nutrients.

Hummingbirds use their bill and not their tongue to catch prey while they forage near the ground and in trees. They love spiders and spider eggs and keep an eye out for small flying insects like midges, fruit flies and gnats. They also check leaves and branches for leaf hoppers, aphids and even the occasional small caterpillar.

Our little hummingbirds are deceptively big on speed. They often seem to explode away from a feeder like a dragster. They typically fly at 30-45 miles per hour (48-72 kph), but can fly up to 60 mph (96 kph). They can even hover and are the only birds able to regularly fly backwards and even occasionally upside down. They can do this because of an extremely mobile shoulder joint.

Be a seasonally savvy bird feeder by installing multiple hummingbird nectar feeders around your yard to draw in these little birds with the big personalities. Visit our store and we'll help you pick out everything you need to attract hummingbirds to your backyard.

 

Mealworms Are For The Birds!

MealwormsMany birds eat insects naturally, so feeding mealworms to the birds is a natural thing to do. Plus, you’ll enjoy watching birds such as chickadees, bluebirds, wrens, towhees, woodpeckers, robins, catbirds, nuthatches, thrashers and others devour these mouthwatering morsels! A Red-breasted Nuthatch was seen taking mealworms from a feeder, and catching them at a rate of three per minute.

Mealworms are the larvae of the beetle Tenebrio molitor. The larvae stage of the beetle typically lasts for 10 weeks. To maintain the larvae in a state of dormancy, they must be refrigerated at 40 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit (lower temperatures can kill the larvae). You can keep mealworms for several weeks and they will maintain their dormant state.

If you would rather not be bothered with looking after live mealworms, you can also offer dried ones. Birds still love them and the high protein content helps baby birds grow strong and healthy. In our own yard, we have chickadees, spotted towhee and song sparrows (to

  name a few birds) that are grabbing the dried mealworms to feed their young.

  Birds typically look for food around the same time each day, so you can place worms in a feeder or       tray at the same time the birds regularly visit. Make sure the birds can access the feeder but that the       worms can’t crawl out! Some Wild Birds Unlimited feeders to consider are the Dinner Bell and the           SideDish™ feeders. Mealworms are a great way to attract birds that don’t ordinarily come to seed           feeders.

  Try a bag during nesting season.